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Gluten Free Gingernut Biscuits

These gluten free gingernut biscuits taste just like the classic ginger biscuits we know and love. They’re packed with rich flavour from ginger and golden syrup, and have that great crunchy texture, perfect for dipping in your cup of tea or coffee!

A hand with light purple painted fingernails dunking a gluten free gingernut biscuit into a patterned white mug full of milky tea, on a matching plate with two more gingernuts and a spoon.

If you have Coeliac disease or are gluten intolerant, chances are you haven’t had a proper gingernut biscuit in years. The gluten free supermarket options tend to be crumbly and turn to mush if you try to dip them in a hot drink.

You’re in luck now though, these delicious homemade gluten free gingernut biscuits have that perfect hard, crunchy texture that makes them perfect for dunking because they won’t disintegrate into your cuppa.

Just like a classic gingernut, they have that rich, warm ginger flavour, and as an added bonus, they are really easy to make!

A rustic metal baking tray with gingernut biscuits arranged haphazardly, with a small jar of ground ginger, a small wooden spoon and a white linen napkin on a light grey marble background.

I’ve been wanting to make gluten free gingernuts for a while but procrastinated on starting because I felt like it was going to take a long time to get right. But when I got an email from a reader called Sam asking if I had a recipe for these, I suddenly… finally… snapped into the zone to give it a try.

I knew it would need plenty of ginger and likely plenty of golden syrup to get that proper crunchy texture, so I scribbled out what I thought would be a starting point recipe and tried it. To my surprise, instead of taking multiple tweaks to get right, I pretty much nailed it on that first try!

Full disclosure, I then tried a bunch of tweaks, because I can’t help myself, and then basically went back to that first recipe 😂

The only real hiccup I had was once I came to testing this with a supermarket gf flour blend instead of my homemade blend, and I’ll talk about that more below in the ingredients.

A patterned white mug full of milky tea, on a matching plate with a gingernut biscuit propped up on the side of the mug and two more stacked gingernuts on the side.

Ingredients

Scroll down to the recipe card for the full ingredients list and printable gluten free gingernut recipe, or keep reading for ingredient tips and process photos.

The gluten free gingernut recipe ingredients in white bowls on a grey marble background.

Gluten free plain flour – This is one recipe where I really encourage you to use my homemade gluten free flour blend – it gives results far closer to a real gingernut than you can get with any of the supermarket blends.

I tested this with Edmond’s gluten free flour, and the results are good – you still get a nice gingery biscuit, but they stay chewier and they don’t look quite as much like a real gingernut biscuit. This is due to the fact that, like most supermarket gf flour blends, it’s made from mostly starch. So, if you really want a gluten free gingernut biscuit that is the closest to a traditional gingernut in looks and texture, this is one recipe where I will tell you that my homemade blend works far better.

If you’re using Edmonds flour you will need to reduce the amount slightly and may need to add some extra water, as it absorbs more liquid. There are notes about that in the recipe card below.

Xanthan gum – Helps to stop the bikkies from crumbling. You can omit this if you use a store-bought gf flour blend that contains a gum ingredient.
Baking soda – Just for a little lift and to help give that slightly crackled top.
Ground ginger – Make sure your ground ginger powder isn’t past its best-before date, or you won’t get that really good ginger flavour.
Brown sugar and white sugar – The combination of the two sugars gives the right amount of spread to the biscuits, and the white sugar gives those little visible grains of sugar that traditional gingernuts have. And before anyone asks – no this isn’t a recipe where you can reduce the sugar. The sugar is what gives these the proper crunch and texture.
Golden syrup – This is also key to the crunch. Normally I don’t notice the difference in baking recipe between golden syrup in a tin and the squeeze bottles, but in this recipe, I have found that the Chelsea golden syrup in the tin works much better. It’s thicker and has a stronger flavour. The squeezy one will work, but the biscuits will spread a bit more, and the flavour will be a bit less rich. I didn’t like the Woolworths brand squeezy golden syrup, it didn’t have enough flavour in the biscuits and it was quite runny.
Butter – I like salted butter in this recipe, if using unsalted, add a pinch of salt to the dry ingredients. I haven’t tested these yet with a dairy-free butter, but I think it should be fine with any dairy-free butter that says it’s suitable for baking.
Water This helps form a roll-able dough if it’s too dry.

How to Make Gluten Free Gingernut Biscuits

A large glass bowl with the mixed dry ingredients and a blue silicone spoon on a pale grey marble background.

Start by sifting the gluten free flour, xanthan gum, baking soda and ground ginger into a large bowl. Then add the brown and white sugar, and use the back of a spoon to squash out any lumps of brown sugar.

The melted butter and golden syrup in a small saucepan on a pale grey marble background.

Next, put the butter and golden syrup into a small saucepan and heat until the butter is melted and the mixture is well combined and just starting to bubble around the edges.

You could also do this in the microwave, just make sure you keep an eye on it so it doesn’t boil up and bubble over.

The crumbly gingernut dough in a glass bowl on a pale grey marble background.

Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix well. The dough will look a little crumbly, but you should be able to roll a spoonful into a smooth ball. If not, add some water a few drops at a time until it rolls smoothly.

Slightly flattened balls of gingernut dough on a baking tray.

Roll tablespoonsful of dough into balls and then flatten gently with your hand. Place onto baking paper lined trays.

Bake the gluten free gingernuts for 17-20 minutes. Baking for less time leaves the biscuits a little chewy in the middle, baking for longer makes them harder and crunchier.

If you want a really hard and crunchy bikkie, then gently press down on each biscuit with the bottom of a glass while they’re still warm.

Overhead view of a plate stacked with golden gingernut biscuits, a mug of milky tea, a small wooden spoon, a white linen napkin and broken biscuit pieces and crumbs scattered around.

Gluten Free Gingernut Biscuit Tips

  • I’ve kept this recipe simple by just using ground ginger for flavouring, but if you like more spice in your ginger biscuits, you can add a pinch of ground cloves or replace half a teaspoon of the ginger with ground cinnamon if you like.
  • For an even more gingery biscuit, add some finely chopped glacé ginger (aka. crystalised ginger or candied ginger) to the dough, or sprinkle it on top before baking.
  • I don’t recommend reducing the sugar or golden syrup in this recipe – this is what gives the biscuits that crunchy texture and rich flavour.
  • If you want perfectly round biscuits, like they just came out of a packet, then as soon as they come out of the oven, use a round cookie cutter that is slightly larger than the biscuits to swirl around the edges and make them rounder. You can see a picture of this technique in my GF Anzac Biscuit post.

More Recipes You may Like

These gluten-free ginger nut biscuits are the perfect baking tin filler. Here are some more gluten free baking recipes you may want to try next.

Gluten Free Ginger Crunch
Gluten free Peanut Brownies
Gluten Free Lemon Slice
Gluten Free Crunchy Lemon Muffins

Are you new to gluten-free baking?

Or just need some tips on how to make the most of the recipes on GFKF? Check out my start guide to learn how to bake safely and successfully gluten free.

Allergen safety ✔️ Gluten free flour info ✔️
Accurate measuring ✔️ Tools + Equipment ✔️

Text in a blue circle reading "new to gluten free baking? Start here."
A hand with light purple painted fingernails dunking a gluten free gingernut biscuit into a patterned white mug full of milky tea, on a matching plate with two more gingernuts and a spoon.

Gluten Free Gingernut Biscuits

These gluten free gingernut biscuits taste just like the classic ginger biscuits we know and love. They're packed with rich flavour from ginger and golden syrup, and have that great crunchy texture, perfect for dipping in your cup of tea or coffee!
5 from 2 votes
Print Recipe Pin Recipe
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Makes: 26 biscuits

Ingredients

  • 300 g gluten free plain flour, see notes
  • 4 teaspoons ground ginger, (or more/less to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon xanthan gum, see notes
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 125 g brown sugar
  • 50 g white sugar
  • 125 g golden syrup, (⅓ cup + 2 teaspoons) see notes
  • 100 g butter, salted or unsalted
  • 1 teaspoon water, only if needed

Instructions

  • Heat oven to 160°C. Line 2-3 baking trays with baking paper.
  • Sift the gluten free flour, ground ginger, xanthan gum and baking soda into a large bowl. Add the brown and white sugar and mix to combine well, crushing any big lumps of brown sugar with the back of a spoon.
  • In a small saucepan, stir the butter and golden syrup over medium-high heat until the butter is melted, the mixture is well combined and just beginning to bubble around the edges.
  • Pour the wet ingredients into the dry, and mix well. The dough will be a bit crumbly, but you should be able to roll it into a smooth ball. If not, add the water a few drops at a time until you can.
  • Roll tablespoonsful of the dough into balls, and flatten lightly with your hand. Arrange 2" apart on the prepared trays.
  • Bake the biscuits for 17-20 minutes. The longer they are baked, the crunchier and harder they will be, but be careful not to let them burn on the bottom.
  • Optional steps: For really hard and crunchy biscuits, gently press down on each biscuit with the bottom of a glass while they're still warm.
    For super round biscuits, place a cookie cutter slightly larger than the biscuits over the top, then gently swirl around the edges to push them back into shape.
  • Allow the biscuits to cool on the trays for 5 minutes, then move to a wire rack to cool completely. The biscuits will be soft while still warm, and harden as they cool.
  • Store the gingernuts in an airtight container. If they start to soften over time, you can dry them out in a low oven for 5-10 minutes.

Notes

Gluten Free Flour – For results closest to a traditional gingenut biscuit, you will need to use my homemade gluten free flour blend. This recipe can also be made with Edmonds gluten free flour, however the biscuits stay chewier, and don’t have quite the same crackled texture on top. If using Edmonds flour, reduce the flour amount to 290g, and you may need to add a little extra water.
Xanthan gum – This helps to stop the biscuits from crumbling. Omit if using Edmonds flour which already contains a binding gum.
Ginger – Make sure your ground ginger isn’t past its best-before date, to get the best ginger flavour. For even spicier biscuits, add a pinch of ground cloves or replace half a teaspoon of the ginger with ground cinnamon.
Golden syrup – Chelsea golden syrup works best in this recipe, ideally the one in a tin, which is thicker and has a richer flavour. The squeezy one will work, but the biscuits will spread more, and the flavour will be a bit less rich. Woolworths brand squeezy golden syrup did not work well.
Sugar – The crunchy texture and rich taste of these biscuits come from the amount of sugar and golden syrup in the recipe, so this is not one where reducing the sugar is a good idea.
Serving: 1biscuit | Calories: 110kcal | Carbohydrates: 20g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Trans Fat: 0.1g | Cholesterol: 8mg | Sodium: 51mg | Potassium: 12mg | Fiber: 0.3g | Sugar: 10g

Nutritional Disclaimer: Any nutritional information provided is a computer generated estimate and is intended as a guide only.

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